7 Asian Films: In-Depth Reviews of Selected New Masterworks from Asian Cinema Adam Good Yazar

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7 Asian Films: In-Depth Reviews of Selected New Masterworks from Asian Cinema  by  Adam Good Yazar

7 Asian Films: In-Depth Reviews of Selected New Masterworks from Asian Cinema by Adam Good Yazar
| Kindle Edition | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, audiobook, mp3, ZIP | 50 pages | ISBN: | 8.27 Mb

Over 15,100 words.Here is an eclectic collection of new cinematic masterworks by exciting directors from China, Taiwan, South Korea, and Japan.WARNING: Some of the reviews contain sexually explicit or suggestive language due to the subject matterMoreOver 15,100 words.Here is an eclectic collection of new cinematic masterworks by exciting directors from China, Taiwan, South Korea, and Japan.WARNING: Some of the reviews contain sexually explicit or suggestive language due to the subject matter and plot line of the movie.Every movie is presented with detailed plot line, selected dialogue, and followed by main plot points.The collection starts with “Sweet Sex and Love” (2003), a South Korean film by Man-dae Bong (WARNING: explicit sexual scenes).

Two lovers start their relationship on pure animalistic magnetism. They make love easily, frequently, with abandon, pretending nothing else matters. But can they maintain their relationship purely through a bond that relies on physical release? Reminds us “No Strings Attached”, a 2011 romantic comedy by Ivan Reitman, which similarly explores the same theme: the impossibility of keeping up a relationship for too long if it’s based solely on physical sex.

However, “Sweet Sex and Love” has a decidedly darker edge to it.“Woman is the Future of Man” (2004) by Sang-soo Hong is the second South Korean film in this special collection that explores the following core dilemma: how to love a woman without betraying one’s closest friend with whom the same woman also carries a relationship. How would one manage to pull that kind of a relationship off especially when one is married to another woman?“The Wayward Cloud” (2005) by the Taiwanese director Ming-liang Tsai is arguably one of the most experimental and audacious movies ever made (WARNING: explicit sexual scenes).

In terms of sheer cinematographic imagination and outrageous creativity, this is a work that rates 110 out of 100. An impossible-to-categorize meditation on urban alienation and commercial pornography as a pernicious stand-in for true love. At the end of this film, you’ll either love or hate watermelons but will definitely look at this fruit with a different eye.“Stolen Life” (2005) from China by director Shaohong Li is a merciless drama about indignities of belonging to the lower class in China through the eyes of a hapless and not-so-smart beauty from the countryside who gets used in Beijing without mercy by an opportunistic heartbreaker.

A gritty urban tale about the kind of fate that sometimes awaits young girls migrating from the country side to big cities like Beijing with hopes of a better future. Once they slip, there seems to be no stop to their degradation and misfortune.“Isabella” (2006) by Chinese director Ho-Cheung Pang is a story of redemption and a tour de force of sentimentality presented with stylistic authority where the soul-wrenching musical score (Portuguese Fado) is the third main character.

The other two characters are Chen-Shing Ma (played by Chapman To), a womanizer Macau cop under corruption investigation, and Bik-Yan Cheung (played by the luscious and luminous Isabella Leong), a girl in search of her missing father.“M” (2006) from Japan by director Ryuichi Hiroki is another modern Asian masterpiece. A young house wife looks for the love and attention she thinks her husband owes her in all the wrong places. Soon she gets tangled up with a pimp with underground connections. Only another and unlikely character can save her.

But the way he saves her opens up another chasm under her feet. Despite all that, the story raises the shocking possibility at the very end that some of the most important elements in the story might not be real at all. Great twist on a roaring story of betrayal and redemption.The last new film in this collection is “Maybe” (2009) by South Korean director Jihong Ju.



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